neil-gaiman:

jedavu:

THE DARK SIDE OF DREAMS 

In the late 1960’s, photographer Arthur Tress began a series of photographs that were inspired by the dreams of children. Tress had each child he approached tell him about a prominent dream of theirs which Tress would then artistically re-create and photograph with the child as the main subject. 

Haunting…

hoidn:

[description: gorgeous photos of the blue walls of chefchaouen]

salahmah:

Chefchaouen, a small town in northern Morocco, has a rich history, beautiful natural surroundings and wonderful architecture, but what it’s most famous for are the striking and vivid blue walls of many of the buildings in its “old town” sector, or medina.

The maze-like medina sector, like those of most of the other towns in the area, features white-washed buildings with a fusion of Spanish and Moorish architecture. The brilliantly blue walls, however, seem to be unique to Chefchaouen. They are said to have been introduced to the town by Jewish refugees in 1930, who considered blue to symbolize the sky and heaven. The color caught on, and now many also believe that the blue walls serve to repel mosquitoes as well (mosquitoes dislike clear and moving water).

Whatever the reason, the town’s blue walls attract visitors who love to wander the town’s narrow streets and snap some beautiful photos. 

(via anticute-slowlyrotatingchococake)

gingerhaze:

Lumberjanes #4 cover and its inspiration: “Forward America” by Norman Rockwell and the cover of the Boy Scout handbook. I wanted to use vintage Girl Scout imagery, but there’s less available. However, there is this Girl Scout postcard that is wonderfully Lumberjanes in spirit:

Ken Russel’s Last of the Teddy Girls

"Russell scouts the streets of post-war London and takes both candid and posed shots of young girls dressed in the classic teddy girl uniform: blazers, trousers and ‘manly’ haircuts. It was one of the first of its kind as portraying the youth culture which, in the 1950s, was just getting underway." TRIBU Magazine Article

(Source: bl00dypunk, via zetablarian)

fotojournalismus:

Portraits of displaced Afghans passing through a tunnel in Mashhad, Iran. Photographed by Mujtaba Jalali

(Source: Aquarium)

"[Fantastic fiction] is accused of giving children a false impression of the world they live in But I think no literature that children could read gives them less of a false impression. I think what profess to be realistic stories for children are far more likely to deceive them. I never expected the real world to be like the fairy tales. I think that I did expect school to be like the school stories. The fantasies did not deceive me: the school stories did.

…Do fairy tales teach children to retreat into a world of wish-fulfilment ‘fantasy’ in the technical psychological sense of the word—instead of facing the problems of the real world? …Let us again lay the fairy tale side by side with the school story or any other story which is labelled a ‘Boy’s Book’ or a ‘Girl’s Book’, as distinct from a `Children’s Book’. There is no doubt that both arouse, and imaginatively satisfy, wishes. We long to go through the looking glass, to reach fairy land. We also long to be the immensely popular and successful schoolboy or schoolgirl, or the lucky boy or girl who discovers the spy’s plot or rides the horse that none of the cowboys can manage. But the two longings are very different. The second, especially when directed on something so close as school life, is ravenous and deadly serious. …We run to it from the disappointments and humiliations of the real world: it sends us back to the real world undivinely discontented. For it is all flattery to the ego. The pleasure consists in picturing oneself the object of admiration.

The other longing, that for fairy land, is very different. In a sense a child does not long for fairy land as a boy longs to be the hero of the first eleven. Does anyone suppose that he really and prosaically longs for all the dangers and discomforts of a fairy tale?—really wants dragons in contemporary England? It is not so. It would be much truer to say that fairy land arouses a longing for he knows not what. It stirs and troubles him (to his life-long enrichment) with the dim sense of something beyond his reach and, far from dulling or emptying the actual world, gives it a new dimension of depth. …The boy reading the school story of the type I have in mind desires success and is unhappy (once the book is over) because he can’t get it: the boy reading the fairy tale desires and is happy in the very fact of desiring. For his mind has not been concentrated on himself, as it often is in the more realistic story.

I do not mean that school stories for boys and girls ought not to be written. I am only saying that they are far more liable to become ‘fantasies’ in the clinical sense than fantastic stories are. And this distinction holds for adult reading too. The dangerous fantasy is always superficially realistic. The real victim of wishful reverie does not batten on the Odyssey, The Tempest, or The Worm Ouroboros: he (or she) prefers stories about millionaires, irresistible beauties, posh hotels, palm beaches and bedroom scenes—things that really might happen, that ought to happen, that would have happened if the reader had had a fair chance. For, as I say, there are two kinds of longing. The one is an askesis, a spiritual exercise, and the other is a disease."

C. S. Lewis, “On Three Ways of Writing for Children” (via vr-trakowski)

(Source: dduane, via vr-trakowski)

lebornaciar:

gods for the modern ageposeidon

do not fear the water. make your home the deep and secret places of the world. in joy give life, sustenance, adventure; in your rage, shake the very foundations of the earth. by your own hand bring steeds to heel and ride out—over the waves, or through them, carrying travellers in your wake. bury your hands in the soft clay of the ocean floor, and build. 

thegorgonist:

Nymphs and Sprites

Inspired by mythology and the natural world, this series started with the root-toed sprite playing the harp strung with spiderweb, and I only recently added the waterfall nymph and—just today—the stone sprite with her snail buddies!  I’ll definitely be adding more, and always open to suggestions ^^

You can buy them on etsy here, here, and here.

(via rhinestonelives)

sepiachord:

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Aliza Razell: Magic and Mystic Photography

Flickrock, Facebook

Massachusetts-based artist Aliza Razell creates tickling self-portraits that explore philosophical abstractions through the merged mediums of watercolour and photography. Using Photoshop, Razell unites the two mediums in her Anesidora (explorations of the Pandora’s Box myth) and Ikävä (the Finnish word meaning the feeling of longing) series.

Magic

(via lydiamartinis)

alafiyatried:

mrnargalicious:

tibby-wynter:

fartgallery:

i bet dragons would probably think it’s really cool that we produce water in our mouths

image

That last image is too adorable to not reblog.

this is the cutest

(via anticute-slowlyrotatingchococake)

"

the divine is full of monsters;

incandescent giants who lick their gold teeth,
whose mouths are full of crumbling cities, who breathe
death and fire and revelation and madness while
diamonds crack like splinters of bone between their gums

their whims are carved in stone, sand, pillars of salt
their feathers sticky with luminescent blood, their fingers
thunderous with creation, lightning in their eyes
that crackles and hisses from every direction of the sky

the divine is not static and humane; the divine does not play nice.

they will eat everything you are.

they will leave you reformed in a roar of light, peel away layers of you like birth
and with a saint’s conviction you will know that nothing feels more like luxury,
better to be blinded by brilliance than close your eyes to awe-

for your lips are always being kissed.

your mouth is champagne roses. you will eat lotuses. your lungs are perfumed and
your bones will blossom into stars. your blood is wine and you are clothed in light;

your skin threshed wheatlike until the gold of you shines.

"

natasza stark, “anchorite” (via mirroir)

(via lydiamartinis)

sosuperawesome:

Vincent Van Gogh, Pablo Picasso, Frida Kahlo and Salvador Dali. Art dolls by Valentina Felce in Florida, US